Get Growing: Plants Galore for Northwest Gardens

Here in the Northwest gardeners are blessed with incredible growing conditions for a wealth of plants, both native and exotic. But how can you choose the best plants for your garden from such abundance?

Our horticulturists, designers and garden writers will help you hone in on the right plants for your garden conditions—wet or dry, sunny or shady, large or small. Discover a world of plants you might never have considered, or find the perfect plants for a real problem spot. Be sure to catch our "Richie's Picks" seminars on the DIY Stage, as horticulturist Richie Steffen shares all the great plants, seeds and bulbs that you can find right at the festival! Plant shopping has never been so fun and easy!

The Seminars by Category are listed in chronological order. Please check the Seminar Schedule for a full list of all our seminars. No ticket refunds for Speaker cancellation.

All seminars at the Northwest Flower & Garden Festival are FREE with your ticket!

Buy Tickets Early and Save!

Richie’s Picks #1: Trees, Shrubs and Surprises for the Long Haul

Richie SteffenExecutive Director, Elisabeth C. Miller Botanical Garden and co-author, Plant Lover’s Guide to Ferns

Many of the plants used in the luscious display gardens at the Festival can be purchased from nurseries in the Plant Market. Richie has visited with nurserymen and women to find the hidden gems that are for sale. He will introduce his top picks from the conifer, tree and shrub categories available at the show. These plants tend to be longer lived in our gardens, so the selection process is all the more important. Richie has done the homework, so you don’t have to!

Wednesday, Feb 15 at 10:00 am / DIY Stage / Book Signing to follow

 

 

A Gardener’s Guide to Botany

Scott Zona, Ph.D.–Research botanist and author, A Gardener’s Guide to Botany

It’s a jungle out there! Your beautiful, tranquil garden is a battlefield in which plants wage war against predators and struggle to outcompete one another for light, water, and nutrients. Using familiar examples, this seminar looks at how plants fulfill the five functions necessary for life: growth, feeding, defense, reproduction, and dispersal. This is a fascinating look at how plants grow—not how to grow plants. Get to know your plant family like you never had before!

Wednesday, Feb 15 at 10:45 am / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Orchids 101: Everything You Need to Know to Grow Gorgeous Orchids Like a Pro

Joe Grienauer–Orchid expert and owner, Emerald City Orchids

Joe will help you get orchids that you treasure with this great hands-on demonstration. He’ll cover basic orchid background, cultural requirements, (light/temp/water/etc.), fertilization, and pest/disease control and reblooming. He’ll review greenhouse vs. window vs. artificial light growing techniques, how to initiate flowers on a healthy plant, which orchids are best for newbies, demo orchid repotting and mounting an orchid to a piece of wood. Even brown thumbs can grow orchids if you learn the basic techniques!

Wednesday, Feb 15 at 11:45 am / DIY Stage

 

 

Discovering Lichens in Your Garden

Jessica L. Allen, PhD–Co-author, Urban Lichens: A Field Guide for Northeastern North America and Assist. Prof. of Biology at EWU

Have you ever wanted to learn more about the wild, wonderful, and colorful lichens that adorn the fences, benches, and trees in your garden? In this presentation you will learn how the lichen’s symbiosis works, how important lichens are to natural ecosystems, and where lichens may be growing in your garden. Come watch this seminar to take a closer look at these often-unnoticed organisms and discover the fascinating world of lichens.

Wednesday, Feb 15 at 12:00 pm / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

GARDEN 101: GREAT STRUCTURAL PLANTS FOR ALL LANDSCAPES

Beyond Arborvitae: Every Garden Needs More Conifers!

Roger RagusaGeneral Manager, Wells Nursery

“Structure” is the term used to cover those plants that give you a great looking garden all year round, no matter what’s in bloom. Structure can come from both broadleaf and coniferous evergreen plants and deciduous shrubs with colorful branches. These three seminars cover a range of fabulous plants that provide year-round interest and great structure. Roger Ragusa kicks it off with conifers for dramatic textures and form and a variety of colors, each with distinct attraction. Mark Turner shows you the many beneficial NW native plants that you can tuck into your garden for added beauty and structure. And finally, Gary Lewis will highlight the functional and aesthetic uses of ground covers in the landscape, including tips and tricks for designing with ground covers to take your outdoor space to the next level.

Wednesday, Feb 15 at 2:30 pm / Rainier Room

 

 

Color In and Out of the Garden

Lorene Edwards Forkner–Author, Color In and Out of the Garden and gardening contributor for The Seattle Times

Color is one of nature’s most sophisticated tools to capture the attention of all living creatures. Learn how cultivating our perception of color and honing our ability to distinguish nuance can be used to create pleasing garden pictures and enhance everyday life. Sharing observations and imagery from her daily practice, Lorene invites you to take a closer look at plants and color in hopes of enlarging the way you see the world and deepening your compassion for beauty in nature.

Wednesday, Feb 15 at 2:45 pm / Hood / Book signing to follow

 

 

GARDEN 101: GREAT STRUCTURAL PLANTS FOR ALL LANDSCAPES

Incorporating Native Plants into Your Garden

Mark TurnerProfessional photographer, author, Trees and Shrubs of the Pacific Northwest and owner, Turner Photographics

“Structure” is the term used to cover those plants that give you a great looking garden all year round, no matter what’s in bloom. Structure can come from both broadleaf and coniferous evergreen plants and deciduous shrubs with colorful branches. These three seminars cover a range of fabulous plants that provide year-round interest and great structure. Roger Ragusa kicks it off with conifers for dramatic textures and form and a variety of colors, each with distinct attraction. Mark Turner shows you the many beneficial NW native plants that you can tuck into your garden for added beauty and structure. And finally, Gary Lewis will highlight the functional and aesthetic uses of ground covers in the landscape, including tips and tricks for designing with ground covers to take your outdoor space to the next level.

Wednesday, Feb 15 at 3:00 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

GARDEN 101: GREAT STRUCTURAL PLANTS FOR ALL LANDSCAPES

Best Ground Covers and Ground Cover Combos for NW Gardens

Gary Lewis–Award-winning owner, Phoenix Perennials and author, The Complete Book of Ground Covers

“Structure” is the term used to cover those plants that give you a great looking garden all year round, no matter what’s in bloom. Structure can come from both broadleaf and coniferous evergreen plants and deciduous shrubs with colorful branches. These three seminars cover a range of fabulous plants that provide year-round interest and great structure. Roger Ragusa kicks it off with conifers for dramatic textures and form and a variety of colors, each with distinct attraction. Mark Turner shows you the many beneficial NW native plants that you can tuck into your garden for added beauty and structure. And finally, Gary Lewis will give you a roundup of the best ground covers and dynamic ground cover combinations for different gardens in the Pacific NW. He’ll highlight hot new introductions to the world of ground covers to keep your garden on the cutting edge.

Wednesday, Feb 15 at 3:30 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Let’s Show Off Our Cool Plants!

Ciscoe MorrisRadio, TV host, columnist & best-selling author, Ask Ciscoe and Oh, La La!

Nita-Jo RountreeAuthor, Growing Roses in the Pacific Northwest

Another competition between Ciscoe Morris and Nita-Jo Rountree, the hortiholics that bring you the Facebook ‘Plant of the Week’ for the Bellevue Botanical Garden Society. They will be featuring the coolest of the cool plants. Watch them battle it out as they explain why their picks are the best for Pacific NW gardens. Besides stunning visuals and entertaining banter, you will learn interesting facts about the plant, how to care for it, and why it is special.

Wednesday, Feb 15 at 4:30 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Neither a Tulip nor a Daffodil: Overlooked Bulbs

Eric Hsu–Chanticleer plant information coordinator, horticulturist and blogger of Plinth et al

Daffodils and tulips are the supermodels for spring flowering bulbs that they eclipse other bulbs worthy of growing. Who has grown or are familiar with Grecian windflowers (Anemone blanda), Ithuiel’s spear (Triteleia laxa), spring starflowers (Ipheion)? With such evocative, poetic names, it’s surprising that they are not more popular. Diversifying our bulb plantings not only extends the season, but support pollinators as these under-utilized bulbs have not been overbred.

Wednesday, Feb 15 at 5:15 pm / Hood Room

 

 

Scaling Up: Climbers to Try

Eric Hsu–Chanticleer plant information coordinator, horticulturist and blogger of Plinth et al

With green spaces valued in urban environments and with the effects of climate change a tangible threat, the beauty and importance of vines has never been more pertinent. They add privacy on fences, and screen outdoor spaces from prying eyes. Through their greenery, vines draw dwellings into the garden. Whether trained well or let untamed, they soften hard edges and give the garden a romantic feeling. Clematis, wisteria, and jasmine are obvious options, but leap forward into sausage vine, wood vamp, and cross vine.

Thursday, Feb 16 at 9:30 am / Hood Room

 

 

Richie’s Picks #2: A Mixed Bag of Perennials, Bulbs and Tubers

Richie SteffenExecutive Director, Elisabeth C. Miller Botanical Garden and co-author, Plant Lover’s Guide to Ferns

Gardeners’ passion for seasonal perennials, bulbs, tubers and more shows no sign of letting up. Join horticulturist Richie Steffen as he cultivates his way through some of his dazzling finds from the garden show Plant Market. He will also show you a few other companion plants to go with his selections and provide booth numbers and company names so you can easily find your favorite choices. Richie has done the leg work, so you don’t have to!

Thursday, Feb 16 at 10:00 am / DIY Stage / Book Signing to follow

 

 

Connect with Color

Lorene Edwards Forkner–Author, Color In and Out of the Garden and gardening contributor for The Seattle Times

Connect with nature by capturing the colors of the garden in a simple color study. We’ll explore the nature of color, in and out of the garden. Learn how recording colors in paint, fabric, collage, or photos, can encourage you to slow down, pay attention, and savor the season. Then download the handout with simple directions for creating your own color study and a call to share your colors at #NWFGColorcollective.

Thursday, Feb 16 ay 11:45 am / DIY Stage / Book signing to follow

 

 

Ground Covers: Reduce Maintenance, Control Erosion, Improve the Environment, and Beautify the Landscape

Gary Lewis–Award-winning owner, Phoenix Perennials and author, The Complete Book of Ground Covers

Ground covers offer a diverse range of beautiful options with a variety of colors, textures, and forms. They can unify a landscape, knit together plantings and hardscape, and add layers of beauty. When replacing lawns they reduce our use of water, fertilizer, pesticides, herbicides, carbon-based fuels, and transform a yard into a diverse landscape of habitat and food for wildlife. Gary will highlight the uses of ground covers, including tips for designing with ground covers to take your outdoor space to the next level.

Thursday, Feb 16 at 1:15 pm / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Rooting Out Problems Before You Plant

Linda Chalker-Scott, PhDWSU Horticulture Professor and author, How Plants Work and The Informed Gardener

This seminar will demonstrate the best ways to prepare trees and shrubs for transplanting. Root washing and corrective pruning is different from conventional methods, yet ongoing research demonstrates that this new procedure leads to substantial increases in woody plant establishment and survival. Investing the time to prepare and install trees and shrubs properly will pay future dividends of reduced maintenance and increased plant health for the lifetime of your landscape. Handouts containing the text of the talk will be available to download.

Thursday, Feb 16 at 1:30 pm / DIY Stage / Book signing to follow

 

 

GARDEN 101: NOT YOUR GRANNY’S PLANTS

Quintessential Signs of Spring: Valuable, Versatile Primulas

Ginger Hudson–Garden designer and Director, Jensen-Olson Arboretum, Juneau, AK

No matter what the weather, everyone wants to look out the window at their garden and see beauty from flowers and foliage. Here’s a primer on three plants that you might be overlooking for season-spanning elegance. Ginger Hudson shares the springtime colors, shapes and varieties of Primulas from the Nationally Accredited Primula Collection™ at the Jensen-Olson Arboretum. Deborah Trickett will get you craving the versatile Coleus, now enjoying a renaissance with luscious varieties sure to liven up any summer container or garden with colorful foliage. Finally, R. Theo Margelony shares his obsession with the perennial Hardy Fuchsias, stalwart performers that are hummingbird magnets lasting from summer into late fall.

Thursday, Feb 16 at 2:30 pm / Rainier Room

 

 

Go Bold: Tropical Accents for Inspiring Containers

Marianne WillburnAward-winning blogger, GardenRant.com and author, Tropical Plants and How to Love Them and Big Dreams, Small Garden

Tropical and subtropical plants can add incredible energy and depth to your container gardens—responding to the heat of summer with increased vigor when more temperate accents are fading. But whether you use them as spectacular ‘thrillers’ or stunning ‘fillers,’ it’s important to follow some guidelines in the selection and planting process to help you avoid common pitfalls of pairing, proportion, and maintenance. You’ll also learn to use some of your favorite houseplants as the stars of some of your favorite new outdoor combinations!

Thursday, Feb 16 at 2:45 pm / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

GARDEN 101: NOT YOUR GRANNY’S PLANTS

Crazy for Coleus: Looking at Coleus in a Whole New Light

Deborah TrickettAward-winning container designer and owner, The Captured Garden

No matter what the weather, everyone wants to look out the window at their garden and see beauty from flowers and foliage. Here’s a primer on three plants that you might be overlooking for season-spanning elegance. Ginger Hudson shares the springtime colors, shapes and varieties of Primulas from the Nationally Accredited Primula Collection™ at the Jensen-Olson Arboretum. Deborah Trickett will get you craving the versatile Coleus, now enjoying a renaissance with luscious varieties sure to liven up any summer container or garden with colorful foliage. Finally, R. Theo Margelony shares his obsession with the perennial Hardy Fuchsias, stalwart performers that are hummingbird magnets lasting from summer into late fall.

Thursday, Feb 16 at 3:00 pm / Rainier Room

 

 

GARDEN 101: NOT YOUR GRANNY’S PLANTS

Perennial Favorites: Hardy Fuchsias in the Garden

R. Theo Margelony–Fuchsia expert and blogger The Fuchsietum|A Garden in Portland

No matter what the weather, everyone wants to look out the window at their garden and see beauty from flowers and foliage. Here’s a primer on three plants that you might be overlooking for season-spanning elegance. Ginger Hudson shares the springtime colors, shapes and varieties of Primulas from the Nationally Accredited Primula Collection™ at the Jensen-Olson Arboretum. Deborah Trickett will get you craving the versatile Coleus, now enjoying a renaissance with luscious varieties sure to liven up any summer container or garden with colorful foliage. Finally, R. Theo Margelony shares his obsession with the perennial Hardy Fuchsias, stalwart performers that are hummingbird magnets lasting from summer into late fall.

Thursday, Feb 16 at 3:30 pm / Rainier Room

 

 

Demystifying Botanical Latin

Ross Bayton, PhD–2023 Show Judge, director, Heronswood Gardens, and author, The Gardener’s Botanical: An Encyclopedia of Latin Plant Names

For every gardener, whether beginner or professional, understanding botanical Latin, the language of plant names, is both difficult and rewarding. Latin unlocks a world of information about your garden plants, in books and online, and ensures you apply the right care to the right plant. In this seminar, plant taxonomist and gardener Ross Bayton will guide you through some basic principles of botanical Latin, including its history, meanings and pronunciation, revealing some of the fascinating and touching tales behind the names.

Thursday, Feb 16 at 4:30 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

A Memorable Garden Is Built from a Series of Vignettes

Loree Bohl–Award-winning author of Fearless Gardening and blogger, thedangergarden.com

When reflecting upon a garden that inspires you, do you recall the big picture, a panoramic shot? Or do you remember evocative details, a creative display within the garden, a vignette? These smaller elements encourage you to stop and engage. By including vignettes throughout your garden, you create focused areas within the whole. As a result, the space expands and feels much larger. Loree will share inspiring vignettes from her garden travels, as well as from her own Portland garden.

Thursday, Feb 16 at 5:15 pm / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

For the Love of Hummingbirds

John SheweyAuthor, The Hummingbird Handbook and co-author, Birds of the Pacific Northwest

Hummingbirds amaze and intrigue us. Their high-speed enigmatic lifestyles are a blur; their startling colors and exotic behaviors are delights. Hummingbirds also inspire us—they are like tiny ambassadors with the power to usher people into a deeper interest in and appreciation for the natural world. Join John for this fun-filled program and learn how to attract hummingbirds with their favorite flowers and astute gardening techniques; learn how to cater to them, and how to be a great hummingbird host in your garden.

Friday, Feb 17 at 9:30 am / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Richie’s Picks #3: Garden-to-Table Freshness from Fruit, Veggies and Seeds

Richie SteffenExecutive Director, Elisabeth C. Miller Botanical Garden and co-author, Plant Lover’s Guide to Ferns

Eating wholesome fresh fruit is not just “trendy” anymore; it’s a cultural shift. Anyone can grow veggies and fruit in the garden, and even containers are great on the patio or balcony. Join horticulturist Richie Steffen for his top discoveries from the garden show Plant Market. Indulge yourself in this main course of terrific edibles. Richie will also cover partner plants to go with edibles. Finding just what you want is a breeze, as Richie provides booth numbers and company names for you to follow up on your favorite choices.

Friday, Feb 17 at 10:00 am / DIY Stage / Book Signing to follow

 

 

Ecological Gardening and Companion Planting

Charlie Nardozzi–Regional Emmy award-winning radio, TV host and author, Gardening Complete and No-Dig Gardening

Ecological gardening is a way of gardening that enhances life under the soil and in our gardens. In this seminar you’ll discover the key elements of an ecological garden, including garden practices that build healthy soil, preserve pollinators, create habitats for birds and wildlife and protect and enhance plant growth through finding the right plant partners. Charlie will focus on new advice about companion planting, including information on flower, herb and vegetable combinations that have been proven to work. Sponsored by Gardeners Supply Company & Velcro USA.

Friday, Feb 16 at 10:00 am / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

The Latest & Greatest in Meadow Making

John Greenlee–Founder, Greenlee Nursery and author, The American Meadow Garden and The Encyclopedia of Ornamental Grasses

Come take an all-encompassing dive into the incredible world of meadow making with John Greenlee, an internationally renowned horticultural and design consultant who works with leading landscape architects throughout America and Europe. Here, you will learn to successfully design state of the art meadows that are beautiful and environmentally friendly. During the seminar, John will carefully walk you through how to select, plant and care for plants from around the world.

Friday, Feb 17 at 11:30 am / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Growing and Propagating a Bevy of Begonias

Ann AmatoHorticulturist and seed propagator at Cistus Nursery and blogger, amateurbotannist.com

Begonias are one of the most beautiful plants in our homes and gardens. From the huge blooms that last all summer in the tuberous group, to the luscious leaves of the indoor and conservatory types. Fibrous-rooted, tuberous, hardy, rhizomatous, and rex begonias, where should a beginner begin? From the easiest begonias to the fussiest, care, propagation, and cultivation tips will be shared for both beginners and advanced growers.

Friday, Feb 17 at 11:45 am / DIY Stage

 

 

PLANTS FOR A BETTER PLANET

Newer Plants Showing Promise

Richard Hawke–Director of Ornamental Research, Chicago Botanic Garden

New plants are what make every gardener’s heart skip a beat. But a lot of the time, that new plant requires a ridiculous amount of care and resources to look decent, if it doesn’t die within the first year. Richard Hawke of the Chicago Botanic Garden has spent much of his career trialing plants. Each year he puts new offerings into the test gardens at CBG and monitors their overall performance, determining which are worthy of your hard-earned dollar and which can be classified as unsustainable pitfall plants. Over the past few years Richard has developed a list of newer plants that have done well in the trials—plants that he feels confident enough to recommend to gardeners—and even plant in his own landscape. In this lecture you’ll find out about scores of new nativars and ornamentals that require little input to perform brilliantly. Sponsored by Fine Gardening’s Growing Knowledge lecture series.

Friday, Feb 17 at 1:00 pm / Rainier Room

 

 

A Simple Approach and Best Tools for Pruning Most Shrubs and Small Garden Trees

Christina PfeifferHorticulture consultant and educator, ISA certified arborist and co-author, Pacific Northwest Gardening Month-by-Month

Pruning shrubs and small trees is very much a science as well as an art. If you’ve had the frustration of not getting the results you expected after pruning, this invaluable seminar will help you figure out the right tools, the right cuts, and the best timing to get the most out of your garden shrubs with the least amount of effort. Properly pruned trees enhance their beauty and add value to your landscaping. Your shrubs and trees will thank you!

Friday, Feb 17 at 1:30 pm / DIY Stage / Book signing to follow

 

 

PLANTS FOR A BETTER PLANET

Praise and Protection: Why You Should Care About Endangered Plants

Sue Milliken and Kelly Dodson–Founders, Far Reaches Botanical Conservancy and Far Reaches Farm

Chances are, you’re familiar with nursery owners Sue Milliken and Kelly Dodson and perhaps some of the plants they have introduced to the Pacific Northwest and gardeners across the country via their plant explorations abroad. But more recently, the couple has started a nonprofit organization, Far Reaches Botanical Conservancy with goal of preserving botanically important rare and endangered plants. In this lecture you’ll learn why conservation efforts like these are important to the world of horticulture and the planet as a whole. Sue and Kelly will also share some success stories of plants that have been fostered at the conservancy and that you might be able to grow in your gardens to further the cause of preservation. Sponsored by Fine Gardening’s Growing Knowledge lecture series.

Friday, Feb 17 at 2:15 pm / Rainier Room

 

 

PLANTS FOR A BETTER PLANET

Everywhere Plants: Natives That Make Great Supporting Players

Kelly D. Norris–Award-winning plant expert, designer and author, New Naturalism

Ecological generalists—plants with broad tolerances to where they root—power the planet. Many of these species lurk in the shadows of traditional gardens or sulk in obscurity on the garden floor. But prevalence is their virtue; they have adapted to a wide range of growing conditions across a considerable geographic footprint. In this immersive class, renowned plantsman Kelly Norris will introduce the audience to a wide range of ecological generalists from North America and explain what makes them important to the ecology of the garden. Participants will learn about varied plant communities, the ecological properties that define them, and how to translate them into gardening practice, as well. Sponsored by Fine Gardening’s Growing Knowledge lecture series.

Friday, Feb 17 at 3:30 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Groundcovers: Great Alternatives to Turf Grass

Kathy Jentz–Award-winning author, Groundcover Revolution, co-author, The Urban Garden and editor/publisher, Washington Gardener

Groundcovers are low-growing plants that serve many different purposes in the landscape from limiting weed growth to stabilizing slopes to adding texture to your garden. Kathy Jentz, author of the forthcoming book, Groundcover Revolution, will cover several of these beautiful, hard-working plants and the best kinds to use for your region.

Friday, Feb 17 at 4:00 pm / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Grow More Flowers

Jenny Rose Carey–Garden writer, photographer, and author, The Ultimate Flower Gardener’s Guide and Glorious Shade

We love flowers. The question is how can we grow lots and lots of our favorite flowers in a small space? Jenny Rose loves a floriferous garden, and she will share some of her ideas for growing as many flowers as possible for as many months as possible. Whether you garden in flower beds or containersplant choice and management techniques can provide a succession of flowery blooms from spring through fall.

Friday, Feb 17 at 6:30 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Hydrangea Happiness, Hydrangea Hysteria

C L Fornari–Author, Coffee for Roses and The Cocktail Garden Hour and award-winning co-host, Plantrama Podcast

From the blue mopheads and lacecaps to the white panicles and beyond, there’s a hydrangea for every garden. Learn which varieties will live and flower well in your gardens. Find out how to prune those blue-flowering types that bloom on “old wood.” Hear about shorter varieties, and types that do well in pots. Have your Hydrangea questions answered, and discover how to get long-lasting flowers in your yard and garden. From sun to shade, from tall to small, there is a hydrangea for every garden, and attendees will discover the plants that are right for them.

Saturday, Feb 18 at 10:00 am / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Foraging 101: Discover the Bounty of Nature’s Pantry

Ellen ZachosAward-winning co-host, Plantrama Podcast, and author, The Forager’s Pantry, Backyard Foraging and The Wildcrafted Cocktail

Foraging is hot! Blame it on the pandemic, or on the fact that it’s good, clean, delicious fun…either way, it’s a great way to learn your plants and local eco-system. We’ll focus on easy-to-identify edible plants that have NO poisonous look-alikes. I’ll explain relevant habitats, how to harvest sustainably, and what you can do with your wild edibles. Once the fear factor is gone, you’ll revel in the unbuyable flavors foraging has to offer.

Saturday, Feb 18 at 10:45 am / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Garden Alchemy: Soil Building, Compost, and Pest Management Using the Power of Plants!

Stephanie RoseAward-winning author, The Regenerative Garden, Garden Made and Garden Alchemy and founder of GardenTherapy.ca

This importance of having healthy soil to feed our plants—and ourselves—is becoming more and more clear. This seminar guides you through four easy pieces to growing an organic garden, with recipes and projects for building soil, composting, natural fertilizers, and managing insects/pests. Experienced and beginner gardeners who want to have more control over their garden’s care will love the practical DIY recipes using herbs, plants, and common household materials. 

Saturday, Feb 18 at 1:00 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

A Case for Trees: A Positive Solution to the Negative Effects of Climate Change

Dan Lambe–Award-winning Chief Executive of the Arbor Day Foundation and co-author, Now is the Time for Trees

Dan Lambe wants to talk trees—how they oxygenate the planet, purify water and air, lower city temperatures, provide habitat, nurture the soul, and provide essential food sources. He will leave you with simple and straightforward tips about how to become a tree lover and, more importantly, a tree planter. He will deliver a simple, powerful, and POSITIVE message: trees are the number one nature-based solution for reversing the negative effects of a changing climate. Each of us can make an impact by planting the world’s most valuable resource.

Saturday, Feb 18 at 1:15 pm / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Get Free Plants When You Propagate like the Pros!

Charlie Nardozzi–Regional Emmy award-winning radio, TV host and author, Gardening Complete and No-Dig Gardening

Many gardeners would love more of their favorite plants, but shy away from the expense. You can save money and still have those plants by propagating them yourself. In this hands-on demonstration, Charlie Nardozzi will show the best ways to propagate popular trees, shrubs, houseplants and flowers. Learn plant division, taking and rooting leaf, stem and hardwood cuttings and air layering, along with rooting hormone powders, the best soils, and the watering and light conditions to be successful. It’s fun and easy to get more of your favorite plants when you learn to propagate! Sponsored by Gardeners Supply Company & Velcro USA.

Saturday, Feb 18 at 1:30 pm / DIY Stage / Book signing to follow

 

 

Flower Garden Inspiration

Jenny Rose Carey–Garden writer, photographer, and author, The Ultimate Flower Gardener’s Guide and Glorious Shade

Do you want to start or renovate your flower garden but need design and plant choice ideas and inspiration? Join Jenny Rose as she shows a range of beautiful, varied and themed flower gardenscutting gardens, fragrance gardens, pollinator gardens and more. Get lots of positive ideas, and top ten plant lists for your own flower garden this coming season.

Saturday, Feb 18 at 2:45 pm / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Light, Water, Action! How to Grow Beautiful Houseplants

Susan Maki–Designer, buyer, and houseplant merchandise manager for Squak Mountain Nursery

Are you new to the houseplant obsession? This seminar is for you! Susan will begin with the basics of light, selection, watering and fertilizing. She’ll help you decipher ambiguous light labels, and really understand and measure your light, so you can best decide where your houseplants should go. She’ll also help you match your plants to your personality and lifestyle—nurturer or neglector— to better choose your plant family. Finally, you’ll gain an understanding how to care for your plants, which is critical to your success.

Saturday, Feb 18 at 3:15 pm / DIY Stage

 

 

The Good, The Bad, and Why the @#$%&!?! Did I Plant That?

Ciscoe MorrisRadio, TV host, columnist & best-selling author, Ask Ciscoe and Oh, La La!

With so many spectacular plants to choose from, why go with mediocre, the ugly, or the @#$%&!?! troublesome plants? Some of Ciscoe’s past mistakes still haunt him to this day. Discover Ciscoe’s must-have plants as well as those that you should avoid—at all costs!

Saturday, Feb 18 at 4:30 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Growing Anemones, Ranunculus, Peonies and Dahlias

Anne Long–Owner, The Dahlia House, Skagit Valley

Dahlia House owner Anne Long will share everything you need to know to grow these popular spring and summer cut flowers. The following information will be covered for each variety listed: best time to plant for growing zone 7 – 8; ideal growing conditions (temperature, sun exposure, wind consideration, when to water); soil preparation and amendments; season extension; effective staking and corralling techniques (for peonies and dahlias); harvesting and vase life extension; identifying and controlling pests. This year will be your best ever for growing these fabulous florals!

Sunday, Feb 19 at 10:00 AM / DIY Stage

 

 

The Three Basic Pruning Cuts (and How to Use Them)

Allen Taylor–Award-winning founder and lead arborist, Conservation Tree Care

Pruning is both an art and a science. A well-pruned tree or shrub both enhances its beauty and its value to a landscape. An entire world of tree pruning all comes down to the three basic cuts: Removal cuts, reduction cuts, and heading cuts. People spend their whole careers just learning where and when to use these three basic cuts. We will delve into what these cuts look like, where to use them, and where to not use them.

Sunday, Feb 19 at 10:30 am / Hood Room

 

 

Training Young Trees for Future Health and Beauty

Christina PfeifferHorticulture consultant and educator, ISA certified arborist and co-author, Pacific Northwest Gardening Month-by-Month

The most important pruning for training young trees can be quickly done with hand tools, yet it is often overlooked until much later, when the pruning options and efforts are much more difficult. Learn how to nip those potential problems in the bud with five basic steps for inspecting the structure of a young tree and how to prune early for future structure and long-term beauty.

Sunday, Feb 19 at 11:45 am / DIY Stage / Book signing to follow

 

 

Why Every Garden Needs Conifers

John J Albers–Creator of Albers Marcovina Vista Gardens, and author, Growing Conifers: The Complete Gardening and Landscaping Guide

To meet the challenges of climate change, today’s gardeners want a sustainable garden that last without excessive use of resources or maintenance, while providing habitat for wildlife. Gardeners can achieve this by incorporating long lived, drought tolerant, and adaptable conifers that support wildlife, yet require little care once established. Dr. Albers, scientist, and garden expert, will show you how to select, design with, and use these aesthetically and functionally versatile plants in your landscape.

Sunday, Feb 19 at 3:00 pm / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Be the Boss of Your Bareroots and Bulbs: Learn Planting Tips and Techniques

Sean and Allison McManusCo-owners of Spoken Garden, co-authors of The First-time Gardener: Growing Plants and Flowers, and YouTube channel hosts

Don’t let bareroot plants or bulbs intimidate you this spring. Learn from Sean and Allison how to confidently handle and plant bareroot perennials like Itoh peonies, coneflowers, and more. You’ll also learn bulb planting techniques and ideas to level up your bulb game with “Lasagna” layered bulb containers for both spring and summer flowering bulbs. Take away planting skills, like bulb planting depth, handling, and tools, to help your plants thrive this spring and summer. 

Sunday, Feb 19 at 3:15 pm / DIY Stage / Book Signing to follow

 

 

Fabulously Fragrant Garden Plants

Richie SteffenExecutive Director, Elisabeth C. Miller Botanical Garden and co-author, Plant Lover’s Guide to Ferns

Flowers and Foliage are nice to have, but fragrance can bring your garden to the next level. The memories and places that fragrance can invoke give your garden emotional depth. Learn about some of the best plants for fragrance in the garden as well as some tried and true fragrant plants that will thrive in your garden.

Sunday, Feb 19 at 4:30 pm / Hood Room / Book signing to follow