Fresh Picked: Edible Gardening, Urban Farming and Culinary Delights

Today’s urban gardeners want to squeeze the most from their space, and that includes growing healthy edible produce. Whether you’re new to growing edibles, or want to take it to the next level, we have a wide range of great seminars to help you get the most from your garden or even a condo balcony.

From choosing the best edible plant varieties, organic control of pests and bugs, to preparing the produce you harvested and using your herbs for good health, a wide range of edible gardening is covered by our experts sharing the best tips and techniques you need for success. You’ll soon discover edible gardening is fun and fruitful—and can look beautiful! So take a bite on these seminars—you’ll be glad you did.

The Seminars by Category are listed in chronological order. Please check the full Seminar Schedule for a full list of ALL our seminars.No ticket refunds for Speaker cancellations.

All seminars at the Northwest Flower & Garden Festival are FREE with your ticket!

Buy Tickets Early and Save!

What Your Food Ate: The Roots to Human Health Begin in the Soil

Anne Biklé­Biologist, science writer and co-author, What Your Food Ate and The Hidden Half of Nature

David R. Montgomery, PhD­Award-winning University of Washington professor and co-author, What Your Food Ate and The Hidden Half of Nature

We know that what we eat matters to our health, but one aspect remains underappreciated—what the plants and animals that land on our dinner plates eat. It turns out that the roots of human health begin in the soil, with how we grow crops and raise livestock. Weaving history, science, and visits with innovative farmers reveals the links between soil health and human health become clear, and practices to improve soil health come into focus. Whether you are a conventional, organic, or regenerative gardener, everyone can improve their practices to improve their soil health.

Thursday, Feb 16 at 1:00 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Shake it up! Herbal Happy Hour Garden Mixology

Robin Haglund–Educator and founder and president of Garden Mentors® and Garden Mentors Academy

Take your happy hour to new levels! In this hands-on presentation drafted from her Herbal Happy Hour Garden Course online, Robin demonstrates how to craft tantalizingly tasty libations harvested from beautiful garden-grown plants. She’ll teach ways to craft unique cocktails and mocktails you can grow, blend, pour, and sip in your home garden. Skip pricey bar tabs! Discover how to garden-to-glass your own tangy, tasty, unique, and luscious sippables at home.

Thursday, Feb 16 at 3:15 pm / DIY Stage

 

 

Grow Ordinary Food in Extraordinary Ways

Donna Balzer–Horticulturist and author, Gardener’s Gratitude Journal and No Nonsense Vegetable Gardening

Is your garden in a townhome, condo or small space? Then it is time to start growing ordinary food in extraordinary ways. Using inventive methods to grow outdoor lemons in the Pacific NW, potatoes in bags or strawberries in rain gutters, Donna opens your mind to these novel ideas. Want to eat strawberries for breakfast in spring, or enjoy your own year-round lemons? With food costs rising, considering novel approaches to growing food is a valuable asset to yourself and your family.

Thursday, Feb 16 at 4:00 pm / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Sowing Hope: Grow More Food Across Three Seasons

Meg McAndrews Cowden–Author, Plant Grow Harvest Repeat and founder, The Modern Garden Guild

Accelerating your spring garden sparks a cascading effect across the entire growing season. Learn why and how to maximize spring productivity—and followed by a productive summer and fall garden too. With succession planting the right seeds at the right time, we can all grow more food for longer, the very thing our planet needs.

Friday, Feb 17 at 10:45 am / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Creative Vegetable Gardening: How to Get More Joy Out of Growing Food

Kelly Smith Trimble–Editor, writer and author,The Creative Vegetable Gardener and Vegetable Gardening Wisdom

Between square-foot style and the ubiquitous rectangular wooden raised bed, vegetable gardens are often the last to be considered creative. But creativity fuels the resourceful spirit a vegetable gardener needs to be successful—and to have fun! We’ll explore inspiration from other types of gardening, from perennials to permaculture, to find ideas that help us break outside the box and discover more creativity, connection, and joy in the practice of growing food.

Friday, Feb 17 at 1:15 pm / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Weird Vegetable Problems: Abiotic Disorders and How to Prevent Them

Susan Mulvihill—Author, The Vegetable Garden Problem Solver Handbook and Vegetable Garden Pest Handbook, and garden columnist for Spokesman Review

Vegetable gardeners are all too familiar with insect pests and plant diseases. But what about the frustrating problems that are either caused by the weather or something we did or did not do? Author Susan Mulvihill discusses blossom-end rot, sunburn, fruit cracking, bolting, leaf roll, and bitterness. Most of these disorders are preventable. Learn the simple steps you can take in your garden to eliminate or greatly reduce the chance they will become a problem.

Friday, Feb 17 at 5:00 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

What Your Food Ate: The Roots to Human Health Begin in the Soil

Anne Biklé­Biologist, science writer and co-author, What Your Food Ate and The Hidden Half of Nature

David R. Montgomery, PhD­Award-winning University of Washington professor and co-author, What Your Food Ate and The Hidden Half of Nature

We know that what we eat matters to our health, but one aspect remains underappreciated—what the plants and animals that land on our dinner plates eat. It turns out that the roots of human health begin in the soil, with how we grow crops and raise livestock. Weaving history, science, and visits with innovative farmers reveals the links between soil health and human health become clear, and practices to improve soil health come into focus. Whether you are a conventional, organic, or regenerative gardener, everyone can improve their practices to improve their soil health.

Saturday, Feb 18 at 11:30 am / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

GARDEN 101: TAKING YOUR EDIBLE GARDEN TO THE NEXT LEVEL

What’s for Dinner? Dealing with Unwanted Critters in the Garden

Susan Mulvihill—Author, The Vegetable Garden Problem Solver Handbook and Vegetable Garden Pest Handbook, and garden columnist for Spokesman Review

Edible gardening is more popular than ever and continues to evolve. Gardeners are thinking outside the box, experimenting with layering and succession planting, and discovering new strategies to deal with pesky wildlife. Here are three edible gardening authors and experts to help you get the most from your edible gardens. Susan Mulvihill will help you discover methods for determining which critter is causing you problems, how you can take action, and share an array of creative and practical strategies you can implement to make your garden less appealing to them. Kelly Smith Trimble unboxes the edible garden, helping you break out of boxy and boring gardens to discover more creativity, connection, and joy in the practice of growing food. And Meg McAndrews Cowden will inspire you with practical planting schedules and tips to push the envelope of your growing season, bringing diversity within and across your growing seasons to extend your garden’s bounty beyond what you thought possible

Saturday, Feb 18 at 2:30 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

GARDEN 101: TAKING YOUR EDIBLE GARDEN TO THE NEXT LEVEL

Unboxing The Edible Garden: How to Grow Outside the Lines

Kelly Smith Trimble–Editor, writer and author,The Creative Vegetable Gardener and Vegetable Gardening Wisdom

Edible gardening is more popular than ever and continues to evolve. Gardeners are thinking outside the box, experimenting with layering and succession planting, and discovering new strategies to deal with pesky wildlife. Here are three edible gardening authors and experts to help you get the most from your edible gardens. Susan Mulvihill will help you discover methods for determining which critter is causing you problems, how you can take action, and share an array of creative and practical strategies you can implement to make your garden less appealing to them. Kelly Smith Trimble unboxes the edible garden, helping you break out of boxy and boring gardens to discover more creativity, connection, and joy in the practice of growing food. And Meg McAndrews Cowden will inspire you with practical planting schedules and tips to push the envelope of your growing season, bringing diversity within and across your growing seasons to extend your garden’s bounty beyond what you thought possible

Saturday, Feb 18 at 3:00 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

GARDEN 101: TAKING YOUR EDIBLE GARDEN TO THE NEXT LEVEL

Layering Succession in the Food Garden

Meg McAndrews Cowden–Author, Plant Grow Harvest Repeat and founder, The Modern Garden Guild

Edible gardening is more popular than ever and continues to evolve. Gardeners are thinking outside the box, experimenting with layering and succession planting, and discovering new strategies to deal with pesky wildlife. Here are three edible gardening authors and experts to help you get the most from your edible gardens. Susan Mulvihill will help you discover methods for determining which critter is causing you problems, how you can take action, and share an array of creative and practical strategies you can implement to make your garden less appealing to them. Kelly Smith Trimble unboxes the edible garden, helping you break out of boxy and boring gardens to discover more creativity, connection, and joy in the practice of growing food. And Meg McAndrews Cowden will inspire you with practical planting schedules and tips to push the envelope of your growing season, bringing diversity within and across your growing seasons to extend your garden’s bounty beyond what you thought possible

Saturday, Feb 18 at 3:30 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Spring Edible Garden Planning for Small Spaces

Christy WilhelmiAward-winning blogger, Gardenerd and author, Gardening for Geeks and Grow Your Own Mini Fruit Garden

Do you struggle with finding room for everything you want to grow in your veggie garden? Learn Christy’s invaluable process that you can repeat season after season to plan your vegetable garden ahead of time. Discover tried and true methods for tracking progress and crop rotation, as well as tricks of the trade for making the most of every square inch. You will reap a bountiful harvest with some spring garden planning!

Sunday, Feb 19 at 12:00 pm / Hood Room / Book signing to follow

 

 

Grow–Harvest–Preserve: Getting the Best from Your Herb Garden

Sue Goetz CPH, EcoProOwner, Creative Gardener and author, Complete Container Herb Gardening and A Taste for Herbs

It all starts in the garden, growing fresh herbs—then the journey continues with learning how to use them. Discover harvesting tips for the best ways to fully capture the essence of all your herbs, how to preserve them, freezing and drying techniques, and how to use herbs in infusions. Also learn proper storage and herb blending ideas for use in teas, culinary dishes, and natural beauty, healing, and personal care, and more.

Sunday, Feb 19 at 1:30 pm / DIY Stage / Book signing to follow

 

 

Raised Bed Gardens: Keeping Your VeggiesAnd Your FamilyHealthy

Linda Chalker-Scott, PhDWSU Horticulture Professor and author, How Plants Work and The Informed Gardener

Raised bed gardening is increasingly popular, especially for gardeners with limited growing space or contaminated soil. This seminar will present the science-based nuts and bolts of raised bed gardening: how to select the proper materials, what to use as planting media, and how to manage soil fertility, weeds, and pests in environmentally friendly ways. Handouts containing the text of the talk will be available to download.

Sunday, Feb 19 at 4:00 pm / Rainier Room / Book signing to follow